WHAT WE DO

Working under the Faculty of Humanities we are currently developing projects with literary scholars, archaeologists, computer scientists, historians, geographers, linguists, designers, artists, engineers, theologians, and mathematicians among others.

We believe that amiable interdisciplinary collaboration is a very important way forward for Humanities research. Therefore, the mission of the Centre is to create a space of creative relationships where exploratory ideas are encouraged and experimentation with technologies applied to humanities can flourish, bringing together all kinds of scholars within and outside the University of Chester.

We host a range of international projects and we collaborate with universities across Europe, America and Asia. The Centre is composed by an interfaculty team with diverse interests in Digital Humanities and our postdoctoral researchers and students participate actively in the community.

TEAM

Our collaborative team come from the fields of Archaeology, History, Modern Languages, Literature, Media, Geography, Computer Science and Digital Humanities.

Director

Patricia Murrieta-Flores is the Director of the Digital Humanities Research Centre based at the Faculty of Humanities in the University of Chester. She directs several projects based at the DHRC and the Department of History and Archaeology  and she collaborates in different international research projects including: HERA: Deplying the Dead: Artefacts and human bodies in socio-cultural transformations; ERC: The Past in its Place; ERC: Spatial Humanities; and COST EU: Reassembling the Republic of Letters. Her interest lies in the application of technologies for Humanities and her primary area of research is the Spatial Humanities and the investigation of different aspects of space, place and time using a range of technologies including GIS and Corpus Linguistic approaches.
Ruth Nugent is a postdoctoral researcher at the DHRC working on the projects ‘The Reception of English Saints’ and ‘Developing computational approaches for historical graffiti’.  She is also Visiting Lecturer in the Department of History and ArchaeologyFaculty of Humanities, at the University of Chester, UK. Her research focuses on strategies of physical interaction between the living and the dead in English mortuary contexts from the 5th century AD to the modern day in (pre-/proto-/post-) Christian cosmologies. She is interested in synthesising, identifying, mapping, and visualising evidence of absence, presence and touch using digital technologies.
Anna Mackenzie is a postdoctoral researcher at the DHRC working on the project ‘Mapping Intangible Places‘. She is also Senior Project Officer in the Vice-Chancellor’s Office at the University of Chester and gained her PhD in gender and genre in Shakespeare’s works from Chester in 2015. Her research interests include: the varying uses and breaking of literary forms and genres; theatrical representations of death; places and thresholds in literature; and the relationship between Shakespeare’s works and ‘Doctor Who’.
David Harry is a postdoctoral researcher at the DHRC working on the project  ‘The Reception of English Saints‘. He is also Visiting Lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology, Faculty of Humanities, at the University of Chester, UK. His research focuses on the religious and political culture of late-medieval and early modern England, in particular the ways in which political ideology could shape religious practice. He is interested in applying Natural Language Processing to early printed sources in order to better understand the development of commonwealth theory in the pre-modern period.
Javier Pereda is a Web Scientist and Graphic designer who specialises in the facilitation of engagement technologies for the Cultural Heritage sector. His research revolves around the use of Tangible User Interfaces to explore Cultural Heritage data on the Web. In addition, he has developed novel User Experience and Engagement methodologies that promote creation and co-creation of interactive tools. He is interested in exploring novel ways to promote the use of technology for low-digital literacy users and experts alike.

Lucas O’Mahony is an IT Technician, Visiting Lecturer & Module leader for Digital Forensics in Computer Science at the Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Chester. His research interests include network traffic analysis. He is currently studying an MPhil on Investigating Traffic Hiding and Morphing in Internet Protocols. He is also a keen programmer with interests including the converging intersections between Digital Humanities and Cybersecurity.

Katherine Wilson is Senior Lecturer in Medieval History at the History and Archaeology Department of the University of Chester. Her research seeks to understand the relationship between social and cultural change, and shifting patterns in the use of material culture in the later Middle Ages. She is interested in the potential that Digital Humanities theories and methods can bring to explore the mobility of objects across and beyond European boundaries.

Tom Pickles is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and ArchaeologyUniversity of Chester, UK. His research focuses on the social history of the early medieval Church, combining history with archaeology, art history, and the study of place-names. He is interested in combining relational databases with GIS and digital imaging software to record the distribution of evidence for churches in the landscape.

Helen Southall is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Chester, UK. Her research interests include histories of social networks and scenes (for example, live music scenes), and the history and communication of science.  She is interested in exploring the application of Social Network Analysis, Text Analysis, and Visualisation in Digital Humanities.

Claire Griffiths is professor of Francophone Studies and head of the department of Modern Languages at the University of Chester. Her research interests cover various aspects of politics and culture in the regions that were once part of the French empires in Africa. She has published on gender politics in francophone Africa, on French colonial and postcolonial policies, and more latterly on visual representations of slavery in francophone African art.

Serban Pop is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Chester, UK, and a member of the Visualization, Interaction & Graphics research group. His research expertise is on Applied Mathematics, Modelling and Simulation, Image Processing and Virtual Reality. He is interested in exploring the application of Image Processing and Virtual Simulations in Digital Humanities.

Andrew Miles is a lecturer in the department of Geography and International Development, Faculty of Social Science, at the University of Chester. He has a broad research interest in the applications of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), spatial analysis and cartography which spans the realms of physical and human geography and the Digital Humanities.
Paul Earlie is a Postdoctoral Researcher in French at the University of Chester. His research interests include modern French literature and thought, and the interaction between the two. He is also interested in Francophone culture, especially Belgium, and in pedagogical approaches that draw on the digital humanities. At Chester, he is involved in the Savineau Archives project.
Dr Mark Duffett is a Reader in Media and Cultural Studies in the Media department of the University of Chester, UK, and a member of IASPM. His is author of the book Understanding Fandom (Bloomsbury 2013) and has research interests that include popular music, media fandom and Elvis Presley.

Dr Angeliki Chrysanthi concluded her Ph.D. in Digital Heritage at the University of Southampton. Her research and teaching focuses on visitor-heritage space interaction, location-based digital storytelling, participatory design and evaluation of interpretative media for heritage and museum settings.

Panagiotis Ritsos (Panos) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Chester, UK, and a member of the Visualization, Interaction & Graphics research group. His research expertise is on Wearable Computing, Mixed and Virtual Reality, and Information Visualization. He is interested in exploring the application of Human-Computer Interaction in Digital Humanities.

Thaddeus Eze is a Lecturer in Computer Science at the Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Chester. He is the convener of the Computer Science Research Seminars series. His research expertise is on Trustworthy Autonomics and MANET (mobile ad hoc network) with current interest in applying trustworthy autonomics to different application domains.

Alec Charles is Head of Media at the University of Chester. He is author of Interactivity: New Media, Politics & Society and Interactivity 2, and (in addition to publications on literature, journalism, film and television) has written on digital media for The End of Journalism, UK Election Analysis 2015, The Conversation, Tribune, Media in the Enlarged Europe, Reinventing Ourselves and Journal of Contemporary European Research.
Jessica van Horssen is visiting research fellow of the DHRC, University of Chester. Her research focuses on transnational contamination within the global asbestos trade during the 19th and 20th centuries. She is interested in making links between place and people in her analysis of how societies come to understand risk, danger, and contamination. Her first monograph, A Town Called Asbestos: Environmental Change, Contamination, and Resilience in a Resource Community, is available here.
Lee Beever is a Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering of the University of Chester, UK. His research expertise is on Game Design, Game Development, 3D Modelling and Virtual Reality. He is interested in exploring the application of game development concepts to create interactive tools and experiences in digital humanities.
Gary Duckers is a Visiting Lecturer and PGR in the Department of History and ArchaeologyFaculty of Humanities, at the University of Chester, UK. Gary’s research interests include the archaeological applications of GIS and remote sensing technology, the role of cartography in heritage management, archaeological informatics, and medieval/post medieval landscapes.